Cutaneous mucormycosis secondary to penetrative trauma

Zahoor, Bilal, Kent, Stephen and Wall, Daryl (2016) Cutaneous mucormycosis secondary to penetrative trauma. Injury, 47 7: 1383-1387. doi:10.1016/j.injury.2016.03.011


Author Zahoor, Bilal
Kent, Stephen
Wall, Daryl
Title Cutaneous mucormycosis secondary to penetrative trauma
Journal name Injury   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-0267
0020-1383
Publication date 2016-07
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2016.03.011
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 47
Issue 7
Start page 1383
End page 1387
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction: Mucormycosis is a rare but serious sequelae of penetrating trauma [1-5]. In spite of aggressive management, mortality remains high due to dissemination of infection. We completed a review of literature to determine the most optimal treatment of cutaneous mucormycosis which occurs secondary to penetrating trauma.

Methods: We completed a review regarding the management of mucormycosis in trauma patients. We selected a total of 36 reports, of which 18 were case-based, for review.

Results: Surgical debridement is a primary predictor of improved outcomes in the treatment of mucormycosis [3,6,7]. Anti-fungal therapy, especially lipid soluble formulation of Amphotericin B, is helpful as an adjunct or when surgical debridement has been maximally achieved. Further research is needed to fully evaluate the impact of topical dressings; negative pressure wound therapy is helpful.

Conclusion: An aggressive and early surgical approach, even at the expense of disfigurement, is necessary to reduce mortality in the setting of cutaneous mucormycosis that results from penetrating trauma [4,8,9]. Anti-fungal therapy and negative pressure wound therapy are formidable adjuncts.
Keyword Diagnosis
Management
Mucormycosis
Trauma
Treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
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