Patient-generated subjective global assessment short form (PG-SGA SF) is a valid screening tool in chemotherapy outpatients

Abbott, Jessica, Teleni, L., McKavanagh, D., Watson, J., McCarthy, A. L. and Isenring, E. (2016) Patient-generated subjective global assessment short form (PG-SGA SF) is a valid screening tool in chemotherapy outpatients. Supportive Care in Cancer, 24 9: 3883-3887. doi:10.1007/s00520-016-3196-0


Author Abbott, Jessica
Teleni, L.
McKavanagh, D.
Watson, J.
McCarthy, A. L.
Isenring, E.
Title Patient-generated subjective global assessment short form (PG-SGA SF) is a valid screening tool in chemotherapy outpatients
Journal name Supportive Care in Cancer   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1433-7339
0941-4355
Publication date 2016-04-19
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3196-0
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 24
Issue 9
Start page 3883
End page 3887
Total pages 5
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: In the oncology population where malnutrition prevalence is high, more descriptive screening tools can provide further information to assist triaging and capture acute change. The Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment Short Form (PG-SGA SF) is a component of a nutritional assessment tool which could be used for descriptive nutrition screening. The purpose of this study was to conduct a secondary analysis of nutrition screening and assessment data to identify the most relevant information contributing to the PG-SGA SF to identify malnutrition risk with high sensitivity and specificity.

Methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 300 consecutive adult patients receiving ambulatory anti-cancer treatment at an Australian tertiary hospital. Anthropometric and patient descriptive data were collected. The scored PG-SGA generated a score for nutritional risk (PG-SGA SF) and a global rating for nutrition status. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were generated to determine optimal cut-off scores for combinations of the PG-SGA SF boxes with the greatest sensitivity and specificity for predicting malnutrition according to scored PG-SGA global rating.

Results: The additive scores of boxes 1–3 had the highest sensitivity (90.2 %) while maintaining satisfactory specificity (67.5 %) and demonstrating high diagnostic value (AUC = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.81–0.89). The inclusion of box 4 (PG-SGA SF) did not add further value as a screening tool (AUC = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.80–0.89; sensitivity 80.4 %; specificity 72.3 %).

Conclusions: The validity of the PG-SGA SF in chemotherapy outpatients was confirmed. The present study however demonstrated that the functional capacity question (box 4) does not improve the overall discriminatory value of the PG-SGA SF.
Keyword Nutrition assessment
Nutrition screening
Oncology
PG-SGA
PG-SGA SF
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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