Panarchy and community resilience: sustainability science and policy implications

Berkes, Fikret and Ross, Helen (2016) Panarchy and community resilience: sustainability science and policy implications. Environmental Science and Policy, 61 185-193. doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2016.04.004


Author Berkes, Fikret
Ross, Helen
Title Panarchy and community resilience: sustainability science and policy implications
Journal name Environmental Science and Policy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1873-6416
1462-9011
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.envsci.2016.04.004
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 61
Start page 185
End page 193
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract How does the resilience concept of nested relationships (panarchy) contribute to sustainability science and policy? Resilience at a particular level of organization, the community level in our case, is influenced by internal processes at that level. But it is also impacted by actions at lower levels of organization (individuals, households), and by drivers of change originating at higher levels (national level policies, globalized market forces). We focus on community level social-ecological systems, looking upwards and downwards from there. Our objective is to explore the connections of the community to other levels, the ways in which community resilience is impacted, and the implications of this for sustainability. Conventional disciplines specialize at different levels, a barrier to investigating multi-level interactions. Use of the panarchy concept helps contribute to the interdisciplinary understanding of resilience at the community (and other levels) by drawing attention to cross-scale relationships. From the effect of individual leadership to the implication of pandemics that move swiftly across levels, examples illustrate a diversity of ways in which community resilience is shaped in a multi-level world.
Keyword Drivers
Globalisation
Multi-level governance
Panarchy
Resilience
Social-ecological systems
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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