Interference modulates the rate of forgetting in visual memory: A role for decay in adaptive forgetting

Crawshaw, Eloise (2015). Interference modulates the rate of forgetting in visual memory: A role for decay in adaptive forgetting Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hons2015_crawshaw_eloise.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 1.63MB 0
Author Crawshaw, Eloise
Thesis Title Interference modulates the rate of forgetting in visual memory: A role for decay in adaptive forgetting
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Oliver Baumann
Total pages 75
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
The dominant explanation for forgetting in cognitive psychology is that similar memories form competing associations, leading to interference at retrieval. Yet, more recent theories suggest that processes of interference and decay interact, allowing for an efficient and adaptive memory system that is able to cope with constant environmental changes. The present thesis aimed to explore this relationship in visual memory for 200 scenes. The degree of interference was manipulated by altering the number of images in a semantic category, from one per category (low interference) to five per category (high interference). Memory was tested by two-alternative forced-choice both immediately following encoding, and after 168 hours (one week). As hypothesised, this manipulation uncovered a significant interaction, which was replicated across two experiments. Over the period of a week, scene images encoded under low interference decayed more rapidly than those encoded under high interference. This pattern is consistent with a memory system that organises decay processes based on the posterior likelihood that memories will have future behavioural relevance. This is the first known study to investigate the relationship between interference and forgetting over time in long term memory, and it indicates that the processes of forgetting are indeed more complex than the traditional characterisation of decay and interference as competing and dichotomous theories.
Keyword Visual memory
Decay
Adaptive forgetting

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 06 May 2016, 13:40:26 EST by Lisa Perry on behalf of School of Psychology