Measuring body composition in dogs using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry

Rae, L. S., Vankan, D. M., Rand, J. S., Flickinger, E. A. and Ward, L. C. (2016) Measuring body composition in dogs using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The Veterinary Journal, 212 65-70. doi:10.1016/j.tvjl.2016.04.007


Author Rae, L. S.
Vankan, D. M.
Rand, J. S.
Flickinger, E. A.
Ward, L. C.
Title Measuring body composition in dogs using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry
Journal name The Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1090-0233
1532-2971
Publication date 2016-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.tvjl.2016.04.007
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 212
Start page 65
End page 70
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Thirty-five healthy, neutered, mixed breed dogs were used to determine the ability of multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (MFBIA) to predict accurately fat-free mass (FFM) in dogs using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-measured FFM as reference. A second aim was to compare MFBIA predictions with morphometric predictions.

MFBIA-based predictors provided an accurate measure of FFM, within 1.5% when compared to DXAderived FFM, in normal weight dogs. FFM estimates were most highly correlated with DXA-measured FFM when the prediction equation included resistance quotient, bodyweight, and body condition score. At the population level, the inclusion of impedance as a predictor variable did not add substantially to the predictive power achieved with morphometric variables alone; in individual dogs, impedance predictors were more valuable than morphometric predictors. These results indicate that, following further validation, MFBIA could provide a useful tool in clinical practice to objectively measure FFM in canine patients and help improve compliance with prevention and treatment programs for obesity in dogs.
Keyword Dog
Bioelectrical impedance
DXA
Body composition
Fat-free mass
Obesity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 May 2016, 09:34:15 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences