An investigation of repetitive negative thinking and maladaptive metacognitive beliefs in body dysmorphic individuals

Hyde, Jamiah (2015). An investigation of repetitive negative thinking and maladaptive metacognitive beliefs in body dysmorphic individuals Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hons2015_hyde_jamiah.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 2.77MB 0
Author Hyde, Jamiah
Thesis Title An investigation of repetitive negative thinking and maladaptive metacognitive beliefs in body dysmorphic individuals
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Cynthia Turner
Total pages 97
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
Although theoretical accounts of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) posit that repetitive negative thinking (RNT) and metacognition may play a role in the maintenance of the disorder; presently, the direct relationship between these two variables and body dysmorphic symptoms has not been empirically assessed. Study one aimed to evaluate a measure of repetitive thinking modified for BDD, and study two used this measure to investigate the association between RNT and BDD symptoms in an analogue sample with body dysmorphic concern. Through two online surveys, (N = 582) participants from Macquarie University and the University of Queensland completed measures of BDD, RNT, positive metacognitive beliefs about RNT, depression and eating disorder symptoms. Exploratory factor analysis of the Repetitive Thinking Questionnaire for BDD yielded two factors, consistent with the factor structure of the original Repetitive Thinking Questionnaire. In study two, a sample with no body dysmorphic concern (N =31) was matched to a sample with body dysmorphic concern (N =31) on age, gender, and level of depression. Results indicated participants with body dysmorphic concern reported more RNT and endorsed more positive beliefs about RNT compared with the control group. Within the BDD group, positive beliefs about RNT predicted RNT; however, RNT did not predict BDD symptom severity. Findings suggest elevated RNT and an increased amount of unhelpful metacognitive beliefs may be present in individuals with body dysmorphic symptoms; theoretical implications are discussed.
Keyword Repetitive
Maladaptive
Metacognitive

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 04 May 2016, 15:03:55 EST by Lisa Perry on behalf of School of Psychology