Differences in polysubstance use patterns and drug-related outcomes between people who inject drugs receiving and not receiving opioid substitution therapies

Betts, Kim S., Chan, Gary, Mcilwraith, Fairlie, Dietze, Paul, Whittaker, Elizabeth, Burns, Lucy and Alati, Rosa (2016) Differences in polysubstance use patterns and drug-related outcomes between people who inject drugs receiving and not receiving opioid substitution therapies. Addiction, 111 7: 1214-1223. doi:10.1111/add.13339


Author Betts, Kim S.
Chan, Gary
Mcilwraith, Fairlie
Dietze, Paul
Whittaker, Elizabeth
Burns, Lucy
Alati, Rosa
Title Differences in polysubstance use patterns and drug-related outcomes between people who inject drugs receiving and not receiving opioid substitution therapies
Journal name Addiction   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1360-0443
0965-2140
Publication date 2016-07
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/add.13339
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 111
Issue 7
Start page 1214
End page 1223
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims: To test if polysubstance use profiles and drug-related outcomes differ between those receiving and not receiving opioid substitution therapies (OST) among people who inject drugs (PWID).

Design: An annual cross-sectional, sentinel sample of PWID across Australia.

Setting: Data came from 3 years (2011–13) of the Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS).

Participants: A total of 2673 participants who injected drugs from the combined national IDRS samples of 2011 (n = 868), 2012 (n = 922) and 2013 (n = 883).

Measurements: Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to summarize participants' self-reported use of 18 types of substances, with the resulting polysubstance use profiles then associated with participant experience of a number of drug-related outcomes.

Findings: Polysubstance use profiles exhibiting a broad range of substance use were generally at increased risk of negative drug-related outcomes, whether or not participants were receiving OST, including thrombosis among OST receivers [odds ratio (OR) = 2.13, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.09–4.17], injecting with used needles among OST receivers and non-receivers, respectively (OR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.50–5.13; OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.34–3.45) and violent criminal offences among OST receivers and non-receivers, respectively (OR =2.30, 95% CI = 1.16–4.58; OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.14–3.07). An important exception was non-fatal overdose which was related specifically to a class of PWID who were not receiving OST and used morphine frequently (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.06–3.17).

Conclusion: Regardless of opioid substitution therapies usage, people who inject drugs who use a broad-range of substances experience greater levels of injecting-related injuries and poorer health outcomes and are more likely to engage in criminal activity than other groups of people who inject drugs.
Keyword Drug treatment
Latent class analysis
Polysubstance use
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research Publications
School of Public Health Publications
 
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