Telephone-delivered weight management services in the hospital outpatient setting: Decision-makers' perceptions of their use in routine practice

Whelan, Megan E., Goode, Ana D., Hickman, Ingrid J., Eakin, Elizabeth G. and Reeves, Marina M. (2016) Telephone-delivered weight management services in the hospital outpatient setting: Decision-makers' perceptions of their use in routine practice. Nutrition and Dietetics, . doi:10.1111/1747-0080.12277


Author Whelan, Megan E.
Goode, Ana D.
Hickman, Ingrid J.
Eakin, Elizabeth G.
Reeves, Marina M.
Title Telephone-delivered weight management services in the hospital outpatient setting: Decision-makers' perceptions of their use in routine practice
Journal name Nutrition and Dietetics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1747-0080
1446-6368
Publication date 2016-03-30
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12277
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Total pages 7
Place of publication Richmond, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2017
Formatted abstract
Aim
Providing effective weight management services to the growing number of overweight or obese hospital patients necessitates long-term service provision; however, it is arguably not within the acute-care hospital remit to provide such extended services. Referral to community-based programs is required to provide continuing weight management services. The Get Healthy Service is a free six-month, telephone-delivered lifestyle program, now offered in several states of Australia with potential for wide population reach. However, health practitioner referral into the service has been low. The study aimed to examine awareness and suitability of the Get Healthy Service for referral of hospital outpatients for weight management, among key health-care decision-makers.

Methods
Nine key decision-makers from metropolitan and rural Queensland Health hospitals took part in semi-structured telephone interviews that were audio-recorded (January–July 2014), transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed.

Results
Interviews revealed that most decision-makers had limited awareness of the Get Healthy Service but perceived the telephone service to be suitable for patient referrals. Incorporating Get Healthy Service referrals into patient care was seen to be potentially valuable and relatively easy to implement, with most interviewees suggesting that they would provide a Get Healthy Service brochure to patients who could then self-refer into the service.

Conclusions
The Get Healthy Service provides a referral model for weight management service provision that appears feasible for use in Queensland hospital settings. Increased awareness and a more integrated approach to referrals would likely result in improved enrolment to the service, with future research needed to demonstrate this.
Keyword Dietetics
Health services
Public health
Research translation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ)
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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