The recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice clinical records: a cross-sectional study

Thomson, Allison, Morgan, Simon, O'Mara, Peter, Tapley, Amanda, Henderson, Kim, Van Driel, Mieke, Oldmeadow, Christopher, Ball, Jean, Scott, John, Spike, Neil, McArthur, Lawrie and Magin, Parker (2016) The recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice clinical records: a cross-sectional study. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 40 S1: S70-S74. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12400


Author Thomson, Allison
Morgan, Simon
O'Mara, Peter
Tapley, Amanda
Henderson, Kim
Van Driel, Mieke
Oldmeadow, Christopher
Ball, Jean
Scott, John
Spike, Neil
McArthur, Lawrie
Magin, Parker
Title The recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice clinical records: a cross-sectional study
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1753-6405
1326-0200
Publication date 2016-04-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12400
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 40
Issue S1
Start page S70
End page S74
Total pages 5
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: To document the frequency of recording of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice (GP) clinical records and to establish associations of this recording.

Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of recording of patients' Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in GP clinical records from GP training practices in four Australian states.

Results: Of the 9,704 clinical records examined, the patients' Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status had been documented in 5,165 (53.2%). Higher rates of recording were associated with older patient age, practices outside a major city, patients who were not new to the practice and the patient being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. In encounters with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients, the patient's status had been documented in 82% of records. Those attending larger practices were less likely to have had their status recorded.

Conclusions: This is the first report of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status recording in GP clinical records. Almost 20% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients did not have their status recorded in the clinical record, with indications that recording may be unsystematic.

Implications: Our findings reinforce the need for a systematic approach to identification of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status in general practice and will inform policy and practice in this important area.
Keyword Family practice
General practice
Health records
Indigenous Australians
Personal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Admin Only - School of Medicine
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 03 May 2016, 00:47:55 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)