Repetition blindness and the effect of word frequency and perceptual distinctiveness

Jolley, Jessica (2015). Repetition blindness and the effect of word frequency and perceptual distinctiveness Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Jolley, Jessica
Thesis Title Repetition blindness and the effect of word frequency and perceptual distinctiveness
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Jenny Burt
Total pages 77
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
Repetition blindness was examined in a priming paradigm, in which word items were presented in a perceptual identification task with a prime, distractor and target. Participants were asked to only report the target word. The frequency of the target and the distractor stimuli were manipulated. Each target word was assigned either a frequency matched or identical prime that was then paired with a high or low frequency distractor word. There was a remarkable repetition cost in Experiment 1 that was alleviated but not abolished in Experiment 2 by putting the target in upper case and the other items in lower case. In both experiments there was evidence of frequency effects of the intervening distractor item, and the pattern of results were consistent with the theory of inter-item competition. This theory asserts that low frequency words are stronger competitors against other list items than high frequency words. The results provide evidence in support of the theory of inter-item competition in target identification as well as difficulties in reconstructing the event sequence.
Keyword Repetition blindness
Word frequency

 
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Created: Wed, 27 Apr 2016, 15:05:47 EST by Lisa Perry on behalf of School of Psychology