Biofortification of vegetables for the developed world

O'Hare, T. J. (2015). Biofortification of vegetables for the developed world. In: T. J. O'Hare, Olaf Van Kooten and Bhimanagouda Patil, XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): VI International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables (FAVHEALTH 2014). XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014), Brisbane, Australia, (1-8). 17-22 August 2014. doi:10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1106.1


Author O'Hare, T. J.
Title of paper Biofortification of vegetables for the developed world
Conference name XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 17-22 August 2014
Convener O'Hare, T. J.
Proceedings title XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): VI International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables (FAVHEALTH 2014)   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1106.1
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9789462611009
ISSN 0567-7572
2406-6168
Editor T. J. O'Hare
Olaf Van Kooten
Bhimanagouda Patil
Volume 1106
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Chapter number 1
Total chapters 36
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Biofortification can be defined as increasing the concentration of plant-derived nutrients in the edible organ during growth and development, over and above that which would be considered a LSQUOnormalRSQUO or LSQUOstandardRSQUO concentration. There has been considerable effort to biofortify staple crops to address micronutrient deficiencies (LSQUOhidden hungerRSQUO) in developing countries, but less effort has been focussed on biofortifying fruit and vegetables with phytonutrients to improve first world nutrition. Part of this could be related to the availability of pharmaceutical supplements containing plant-derived nutrients, which have had less regulatory restriction than the introduction of novel food products. There appears to be a growing trend however, away from a LSQUOpill-poppingRSQUO society towards preferences for more natural sources of nutrition and nutritious food. Increasing the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables through biofortification, or increasing their nutrient density, is an attractive means of increasing nutrition without necessarily increasing intake. First-world diseases or disorders are commonly different to those in developed countries, with more emphasis on age-related diseases (e.g., macular degeneration, prostate cancer) or over-consumption (obesity). Biofortification of fruits and vegetables with phytonutrients to address these diseases is underway, and currently includes examples such as phytonutrient-enhanced sweet-corn, tomatoes, and broccoli.
Keyword Functional foods
Zeaxanthin
Glucoraphanin
Sulforaphane
Lycopene
Macular degeneration
Cancer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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