Colour differentiation of high-lycopene tomato fruit through the addition of the colourless-epidermis (y) mutation

O'Hare, T. J., McGrath, D. J., Dillon, N. L. and Walker, I. O. (2015). Colour differentiation of high-lycopene tomato fruit through the addition of the colourless-epidermis (y) mutation. In: T. J. O'Hare, O. van Kooten and B. Patil, XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): VI International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables (FAVHEALTH 2014). XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014), Brisbane, Australia, (9-13). 17-22 August 2014. doi:10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1106.2


Author O'Hare, T. J.
McGrath, D. J.
Dillon, N. L.
Walker, I. O.
Title of paper Colour differentiation of high-lycopene tomato fruit through the addition of the colourless-epidermis (y) mutation
Conference name XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 17-22 August 2014
Convener O'Hare, T. J.
Proceedings title XXIX International Horticultural Congress on Horticulture: Sustaining Lives, Livelihoods and Landscapes (IHC2014): VI International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables (FAVHEALTH 2014)   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Acta Horticulturae   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Leuven, Belgium
Publisher International Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.17660/ActaHortic.2015.1106.2
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9789462611009
ISSN 0567-7572
2406-6168
Editor T. J. O'Hare
O. van Kooten
B. Patil
Volume 1106
Start page 9
End page 13
Total pages 5
Chapter number 2
Total chapters 36
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
High-lycopene tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) are characterised by an intense red flesh-colour, due to an elevated concentration of the carotenoid, lycopene. However, this characteristic is only visible once fruit are cut open, making it impossible to differentiate intact high-lycopene fruit from standard tomato fruit, a clear market disadvantage. The reason that fruit colour of both high-lycopene and standard fruit looks almost identical from the outside is because tomato fruit normally contain the yellow flavonoid LSQUOnaringenin chalconeRSQUO in a thin layer of epidermal cells. It is this combination of naringenin chalcone and the underlying lycopene in the flesh that gives tomatoes their characteristic orange-red colour. By incorporation of the recessive colourless epidermis mutant allele LSQUOyRSQUO (which prevents naringenin chalcone accumulation) into high-lycopene fruit, we have been able to create high-lycopene tomatoes (hp1.ogc.y) exhibiting a deep-pink colour visible from the outside. Hue angle of the skin of the high-lycopene LSQUOyRSQUO mutant and a regular high-lycopene tomato (hp1.ogc.Y) was 30 and 38°, respectively, while flesh values were similar at 31 and 32°, respectively. Removal of naringenin chalcone from the epidermis appeared to improve the visibility of underlying lycopene, such that fruit outer colour became a subsequent indicator of underlying flesh colour. The removal of epidermal pigmentation means that high-lycopene fruit can now be differentiated from standard tomato fruit in the market place without the need to cut fruit open.
Keyword Biofortification
MYB12
Naringenin-chalcone
Pink tomato
Breeding
Solanum lycopersicum
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 26 Apr 2016, 02:37:32 EST by System User on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences