Numbers and characteristics of cats admitted to royal society for the prevention of cruelty to animals (RSPCA) shelters in Australia and reasons for surrender

Alberthsen, Corinne, Rand, Jacquie, Morton, John, Bennett, Pauleen, Paterson, Mandy and Vankan, Dianne (2016) Numbers and characteristics of cats admitted to royal society for the prevention of cruelty to animals (RSPCA) shelters in Australia and reasons for surrender. Animals, 6 3: . doi:10.3390/ani6030023


Author Alberthsen, Corinne
Rand, Jacquie
Morton, John
Bennett, Pauleen
Paterson, Mandy
Vankan, Dianne
Title Numbers and characteristics of cats admitted to royal society for the prevention of cruelty to animals (RSPCA) shelters in Australia and reasons for surrender
Journal name Animals   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2076-2615
Publication date 2016-03-16
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3390/ani6030023
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 3
Total pages 21
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Despite high numbers of cats admitted to animal shelters annually, there is surprisingly little information available about the characteristics of these cats. In this study, we examined 195,387 admissions to 33 Australian RSPCA shelters and six friends of the RSPCA groups from July 2006 to June 2010. The aims of this study were to describe the numbers and characteristics of cats entering Australian RSPCA shelters, and to describe reasons for cat surrender. Data collected included shelter, state, admission source, age, gender, date of arrival, color, breed, reproductive status (sterilized or not prior to admission), feral status and surrender reason (if applicable). Most admissions were presented by members of the general public, as either stray animals or owner-surrenders, and more kittens were admitted than adults. Owner-related reasons were most commonly given for surrendering a cat to a shelter. The most frequently cited owner-related reason was accommodation (i.e., cats were not allowed). Importantly, although the percentage of admissions where the cat was previously sterilized (36%) was the highest of any shelter study reported to date, this was still lower than expected, particularly among owner-surrendered cats (47%). The percentage of admissions where the cat was previously sterilized was low even in jurisdictions that require mandatory sterilization.
Keyword Animal shelter
Cat
Excess pets
Relinquishment
Sterilization
Surrender
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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