Emergency centre pharmacists: Pharmaceutical management to increase bone density and prevent readmission for low-impact fracture patients

Snoswell, Centaine and Falconer, Caitlin (2015). Emergency centre pharmacists: Pharmaceutical management to increase bone density and prevent readmission for low-impact fracture patients. In: Hidden Gems: Medicines Management 2015. The 41st SHPA National Conference. Abstracts.. Medicines Management 2015, the 41st SHPA National Conference, Melbourme, VIC Australia, (193-193). 3-6 December 2016.

Author Snoswell, Centaine
Falconer, Caitlin
Title of paper Emergency centre pharmacists: Pharmaceutical management to increase bone density and prevent readmission for low-impact fracture patients
Conference name Medicines Management 2015, the 41st SHPA National Conference
Conference location Melbourme, VIC Australia
Conference dates 3-6 December 2016
Proceedings title Hidden Gems: Medicines Management 2015. The 41st SHPA National Conference. Abstracts.
Place of Publication Barton, ACT Australia
Publisher Kaigi Conferencing and Events
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Published abstract
Start page 193
End page 193
Language eng
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Background: Pharmaceutical management to prevent recurrent fractures is routinely recommended for post-menopausal women who have sustained a minimal trauma fracture. Emergency department pharmacists can play an integral role in the identification of these patients and initiation of appropriate medications. Aim: To quantify the current amount of post-menopausal patients admitted through the emergency department for minimal trauma fractures who receive appropriate medication to prevent further fractures after discharge. Method: A retrospective review was conducted for all female patients aged 50 to 89 admitted to the emergency department for fracture between May and December 2014 to collect data relating to pharmaceutical management to prevent readmission for fracture. Charts, dispense records, and discharge summaries were audited to identify patients’ who had discharged on oral cholecalciferol, calcium, a bisphosphonate, or other pharmaceutical bone density therapy. Results: Of the 134 patients identified a very small percentage (16.4%) were taking appropriate oral therapy on discharge from hospital. Appropriate therapy was characterised as either an oral bisphosphonate or raloxifene with or without the addition of cholecalciferol and calcium. 51.5% were taking cholecalciferol alone, 23.1% were taking calcium alone, while only 17.2% were taking both. These results highlight that only 16.4% of the post-menopausal patients who were admitted through the emergency department for minimal trauma fractures during the study period did not discharge on appropriate osteoporosis medications to prevent future fractures. Conclusion: The low number of study patients that were on appropriate future fracture prevention medication indicates a positive intervention that can be achieved by clinical pharmacists in an emergency department setting in the future.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Pharmacy Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 20 Apr 2016, 10:26:06 EST by Centaine Snoswell on behalf of School of Pharmacy