Health workers, health facilities and penile cutting in Papua New Guinea: implications for male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy

Tynan, A., Vallely, A., Kelly, A., Kupul, M, Law, G., Milan, J, Siba, J, Kaldor, J. and Hill, P.S (2011) Health workers, health facilities and penile cutting in Papua New Guinea: implications for male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy. Papua New Guinea Medical Journal, 54 3-4: 109-122.

Author Tynan, A.
Vallely, A.
Kelly, A.
Kupul, M
Law, G.
Milan, J
Siba, J
Kaldor, J.
Hill, P.S
Title Health workers, health facilities and penile cutting in Papua New Guinea: implications for male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy
Journal name Papua New Guinea Medical Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-1480
Publication date 2011-09
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 54
Issue 3-4
Start page 109
End page 122
Total pages 14
Place of publication Goroka, Papua New Guinea
Publisher Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research
Language eng
Abstract There has been increasing interest in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in male circumcision (MC) for HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) prevention following compelling evidence from ecological studies and clinical trials in Africa, and the World Health Organization’s recommendation in 2007 that MC be considered part of comprehensive HIV prevention programs in high-prevalence settings. Though no national policy has been established in PNG, East Sepik Province (ESP) commenced a formal program of MC in 2006, and there is evidence that PNG health workers are involved in other penile foreskin cutting activities in many areas. As part of a wider Male Circumcision Acceptability and Impact Study in PNG, we conducted an audit at a sample of PNG health facilities to assess their suitability for implementing a national MC program, and to identify issues that may arise in any future rollout. The clinical audits demonstrated the difficulties with procurement and availability of equipment for general services around PNG, shortage of staff and capacity, and limitations of available clinical space. Results show that the ESP program has been successful; however, the success relies heavily on commitment from key workers to volunteer their time and services. A review of penile cutting activities by health care workers outside of the ESP program showed that the PNG health system is already involved in contemporary and traditional penile cutting practices via formal and informal arrangements: for example, by responding to complications from penile cuts performed by non-health workers, assisting community members to perform penile cutting through provision of equipment and advice, or providing regular penile foreskin cutting services for contemporary and traditional practices.
Keyword Health workers
Health facilities
Penile cutting
Papua New Guinea
HIV prevention strategy
Male circumcision
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 20 Apr 2016, 08:34:52 EST by Anna Tynan on behalf of School of Public Health