Using nestedness and species-accumulation analyses to strengthen a conservation plan for littoral forest birds in south-eastern Madagascar

Watson, James E. M., Watson, Alexander W. T., Fischer, Joern, Ingram, J. Carter and Whittaker, Robert J. (2009) Using nestedness and species-accumulation analyses to strengthen a conservation plan for littoral forest birds in south-eastern Madagascar. International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation, 1 67-80.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ385293_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 523.63KB 0
Author Watson, James E. M.
Watson, Alexander W. T.
Fischer, Joern
Ingram, J. Carter
Whittaker, Robert J.
Title Using nestedness and species-accumulation analyses to strengthen a conservation plan for littoral forest birds in south-eastern Madagascar
Journal name International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2141-243X
Publication date 2009-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 1
Start page 67
End page 80
Total pages 14
Place of publication Lagos Nigeria
Publisher Academic Journals
Language eng
Abstract The littoral forests of south-eastern Madagascar are among the most threatened ecosystems on the island. A conservation plan has been developed for the region due to a proposed mining venture. Here, we provide a novel methodology to assess if the planned conservation measures would effectively conserve the bird diversity inhabiting these forests. Bird community composition within 30 littoral forest fragments was quantified with each fragment characterized by measures of fragment area, isolation, and internal habitat complexity. A nestedness and cumulative species–area analysis was conducted to ascertain the contribution of forest fragments of different sizes in capturing the overall bird species richness. Datasets representing the overall and forest-dependent bird assemblages were found to be significantly nested. The pattern of nestedness appeared to be driven by fragment size. However, cumulative species–area analyses showed that the assemblages were imperfectly nested with ten species displaying idiosyncratic distribution patterns. When a modest conservation target was set (the occurrence of a bird species in three or more fragments), the proposed conservation plan would only protect approximately half the species found in the littoral forests. We show that protecting an additional four large patches would mean that the proportion of forest-birds captured in three or more patches would increase to 70%.
Keyword Madagascar
Conservation
Littoral forest
Mining
Fragmentation
Nestedness
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 19 Apr 2016, 16:03:54 EST by James Watson on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management