Tourist segments' justifications for behaving in an environmentally unsustainable way

Juvan, Emil, Ring, Amata, Leisch, Friedrich and Dolnicar, Sara (2016) Tourist segments' justifications for behaving in an environmentally unsustainable way. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 1-17. doi:10.1080/09669582.2015.1136635


Author Juvan, Emil
Ring, Amata
Leisch, Friedrich
Dolnicar, Sara
Title Tourist segments' justifications for behaving in an environmentally unsustainable way
Journal name Journal of Sustainable Tourism   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1747-7646
0966-9582
Publication date 2016-04-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09669582.2015.1136635
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Misalignment of pro-environmental beliefs and environmentally unsustainable vacation behaviour can cause psychological tension to tourists. They manage this tension by finding justifications for their behaviour, rather than changing their behaviour. A recent study has systematized such justification; this systematics is used in the present study to investigate the existence of tourist segment sharing justification patterns. A finite mixture model with concomitant variables is used to analyse 2785 survey responses. Three segments are identified. The government blamers express strong interest in the environmental sustainability of their vacation, but deny both their responsibility and ability to make a difference. The struggling seekers would not book their dream vacation if it was environmentally unfriendly, yet do not feel in control of reducing negative environmental impacts of their holiday, which they fully acknowledge. The impact neglecters also state they would not book their dream vacation if it was environmentally unfriendly, but their main justification for taking – potentially environmentally harmful – vacations is denial of the negative environmental consequences of tourism. The existence of these differences in justification patterns indicates different approaches could counteract each of these segment-specific beliefs by inducing cognitive dissonance, shown in other contexts to induce behavioural change. Advice on approaches is given.
Keyword Cognitive dissonance
Environmentally sustainable tourist behaviour
Heterogeneity
Market segmentation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
UQ Business School Publications
 
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