Home-end and activity-end preferences for access to and egress from train stations in the Copenhagen Region

Halldórsdóttir, Katrin, Nielsen, Otto A. and Prato, Carlo Giacomo (2016). Home-end and activity-end preferences for access to and egress from train stations in the Copenhagen Region. In: Transportation Research Board (TRB) 95th Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, United States, (). 10-14 January 2016.

Author Halldórsdóttir, Katrin
Nielsen, Otto A.
Prato, Carlo Giacomo
Title of paper Home-end and activity-end preferences for access to and egress from train stations in the Copenhagen Region
Conference name Transportation Research Board (TRB) 95th Annual Meeting
Conference location Washington, DC, United States
Conference dates 10-14 January 2016
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Fully published paper
Total pages 16
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Increasing public transport use with the aim of improving the sustainability of cities should not focus only on enhancing level and quality of the service offered, but also on understanding determinants of the choice of access and egress mode to and from the railway network. This study proposes a model that recognizes the difference in preference structure at the home-end and activity-end for travellers who have chosen train as their main travel mode, investigates the effect of policy variables such as car parking availability, park & ride opportunity, bicycle parking availability and type, and bicycle carrying on train possibility, and accommodates the heterogeneity in the travellers’ preferences and alternative mode perceptions. Accordingly, this study analyses the choices between five transport modes (i.e., walking, cycling, being a car driver, being a car passenger, riding a bus) for 2,921 home-end trips and 3,658 activity-end trips with a mixed logit model that accounts for heteroscedasticity across alternative modes and repeated observations across individuals. Model estimates uncover the importance of travel time and trip characteristics, underline the relevance of bicycle parking to the choice of cycling to the train station, but most importantly reveal that travellers have heterogeneous perceptions of the alternatives and the travel time, as well as their preference structure relates more to their socio-economic characteristics rather than the trip characteristics. In a nutshell, improving bicycle parking might certainly improve the accessibility to train stations, but addressing specific population groups with specific trip purposes might surely provide an even higher boost in the sustainability of the travel choices after selecting train as the main transport mode.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting 2016 Paper #16-5744

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Civil Engineering Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 18 Apr 2016, 18:45:30 EST by Carlo Prato on behalf of School of Civil Engineering