Association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature in China: a national cross-sectional survey

Li, Qin, Wang, Hai-Jun, Song, Yi, Ma, Jun, Song, Jie-Yun and Guo, Yuming (2016) Association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature in China: a national cross-sectional survey. Science of The Total Environment, 557-558 2016: 880-887. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.02.135


Author Li, Qin
Wang, Hai-Jun
Song, Yi
Ma, Jun
Song, Jie-Yun
Guo, Yuming
Title Association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature in China: a national cross-sectional survey
Journal name Science of The Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-1026
0048-9697
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.02.135
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 557-558
Issue 2016
Start page 880
End page 887
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Abstract

It is well documented that short-term exposure to extreme ambient temperature is associated with respiratory disorder. However, few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's lung function. The present study aimed to investigate the association between long-term exposure to local ambient temperature and children's forced vital capacity (FVC) in China. We analyzed the FVC data of 71,768 children from the 2010 Chinese National Survey on Students' Construction and Health (CHNSCH), and local annual average ambient temperature, relative humidity, air pollutants data from China Meteorological Administration and Ministry of Environment Protection of China. Generalized additive model (GAM) with non-linear function was used to examine the effect of ambient temperature on children's FVC. The results showed that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of FVC in Chinese children within certain temperature range while adjusting for individual characteristics, socioeconomic conditions, air pollutants and relative humidity. The largest alteration of FVC related to the annual average temperature difference among cities from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC. The similar association was found in both physically active and inactive children, while the largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference reached 329.1 ml (95%CI: 296.7, 361.6) in physically active children and 290.5 ml (95%CI: 255.7, 325.3) in physically inactive ones. Public health policy should be developed for protecting children's respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather.

Key message

What is the key question?

Few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's forced vital capacity (FVC). We analyzed the Chinese national survey data to clarify the association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature.

What is the bottom line?

Our study found that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of forced vital capacity in children of 30 cities in China. The largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC.

Why read on?

The presented study provide some evidence about long-term effect of temperature on children's respiratory health and public health policy should be developed for protecting children from adverse effects of low temperature on their respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather.
Keyword Forced vital capacity
Temperature
Children
Long-term exposure
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 18 Apr 2016, 08:43:39 EST by Yuming Guo on behalf of School of Public Health