Diarrhoea and suboptimal feeding practices in Nigeria: evidence from the national household surveys

Ogbo, Felix A., Page, Andrew, Idoko, John, Claudio, Fernanda and Agho, Kingsley E. (2016) Diarrhoea and suboptimal feeding practices in Nigeria: evidence from the national household surveys. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 30 4: 346-355. doi:10.1111/ppe.12293


Author Ogbo, Felix A.
Page, Andrew
Idoko, John
Claudio, Fernanda
Agho, Kingsley E.
Title Diarrhoea and suboptimal feeding practices in Nigeria: evidence from the national household surveys
Journal name Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1365-3016
0269-5022
Publication date 2016-07
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ppe.12293
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 30
Issue 4
Start page 346
End page 355
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Globally, Nigeria has the largest burden of infectious diseases (including diarrhoea). Optimal feeding practices have been well-documented to protect against diarrhoea in other contexts; but this benefit has not been broadly studied in Nigeria. The study aimed to examine the association between diarrhoea and childhood feeding practices to provide country-specific evidence.

Method:
Data from the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey for the period spanning 1999-2013 were used. Prevalence of diarrhoea by infant and young child feeding indicators was estimated, and the association between diarrhoea and childhood feeding indicators was examined using multilevel regression analyses.

Results: Prevalence of diarrhoea was higher among children whose mothers did not initiate breast feeding within the first hour of birth, infants who were not exclusively breastfed, and infants who were prematurely introduced to complementary foods. Early initiation of breast feeding was significantly associated with lower risk of diarrhoea (RR 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63, 0.74). Exclusively breastfed infants were less likely to develop diarrhoea compared to non-exclusively breastfed infants (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44, 0.86). Predominant breast feeding was significantly associated with a lower risk of diarrhoea (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.54, 0.80). Bottle feeding and introduction of complementary foods were associated with a higher risk of diarrhoea.

Conclusion: Early initiation of breast feeding as well as exclusive and predominant breast feeding protect against diarrhoea in Nigeria, while bottle feeding and introduction of complementary foods were risk factors for diarrhoea. Community- and facility-based initiatives are needed to improve feeding practices, and to reduce diarrhoea prevalence in Nigeria.
Keyword Breast feeding
Complementary feeding
Diarrhoea
Infant and young child
Nigeria
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
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