The thin ideal: Discrepancies in children’s normality and attractiveness ratings of female and male bodies and the influence of the media

Newport, Victoria (2015). The thin ideal: Discrepancies in children’s normality and attractiveness ratings of female and male bodies and the influence of the media Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hons2015_newport_victoria.pdf Thesis full text application/pdf 7.91MB 0
Author Newport, Victoria
Thesis Title The thin ideal: Discrepancies in children’s normality and attractiveness ratings of female and male bodies and the influence of the media
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Virginia Slaughter
Total pages 63
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
The thin ideal refers to a slim body shape that is considered to be the ideal body shape by individuals in western societies. This study was a partial replication and extension of a previous study and further examines the pervasiveness of the thin ideal in school-aged children by determining whether or not they hold the same thin ideal for male bodies as they do for female bodies. It also explores the role of media as an influencing factor in children’s development of the thin ideal. Forty-four children (aged 4–10 years old) rated the normality and attractiveness of female and male bodies from 12 different photo sets. Children’s weekly television consumption was also examined. As hypothesized, the female bodies that children rated as attractive were significantly thinner than the female bodies they rated as normal. In contrast, there was no significant difference between children’s normality and attractiveness ratings of male bodies. This provides evidence for the presence of an objective female thin ideal, and the absence of an objective male thin ideal in children. As media portrayals of female and male bodies differ, these findings suggest that – in line with the Tripartite Influence Model – media is an important contributing factor in children’s development of the thin ideal. However, contrary to predictions, children’s weekly television consumption had no influence on whether or not children held an objective thin ideal for either gender. As thin ideal internalization is a known risk factor for body dissatisfaction and eating disorder symptomatology, gaining a deeper insight into the pervasiveness and possible influencing factors of the thin ideal is crucial. Limitations of this study and suggestions for future research are also discussed.
Keyword Attractiveness
Children’s
Influence
Media

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2016, 14:58:56 EST by Lisa Perry on behalf of School of Psychology