Towards understanding drivers of wildlife population trends in terrestrial protected areas

Barnes, M., Craigie, I. D. and Hockings, M. (2016). Towards understanding drivers of wildlife population trends in terrestrial protected areas. In Lucas N. Joppa, Jonathan E. M. Baillie and John G. Robinson (Ed.), Protected areas: are they safeguarding biodiversity (pp. 134-149) Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi:10.1002/9781118338117.ch8


Author Barnes, M.
Craigie, I. D.
Hockings, M.
Title of chapter Towards understanding drivers of wildlife population trends in terrestrial protected areas
Title of book Protected areas: are they safeguarding biodiversity
Place of Publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1002/9781118338117.ch8
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Year available 2016
Series Conservation science and practice series
ISBN 9781118338162
9781118338155
Editor Lucas N. Joppa
Jonathan E. M. Baillie
John G. Robinson
Chapter number 8
Start page 134
End page 149
Total pages 16
Total chapters 14
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract/Summary International conservation efforts rely heavily on protected areas, which are commonly considered the most important tool available to maintain habitat integrity and species diversity in the face of increasing anthropogenic threats worldwide. Improved understanding of drivers would lead to management and policy that are more likely to maximise species outcomes in protected areas, and this would yield tangible conservation benefits in the short and long term. This chapter presents findings from evaluations of recent and historical literature and examines three new lines of evidence that illuminate possible drivers of wildlife population outcomes in terrestrial protected areas. First, it examines emergent factors as identified in the literature, examines the findings of the global study on management effectiveness and presents two contrasting quantitative case studies from Canada and Africa. The chapter also highlights key synergies and differences between the findings of these studies.
Keyword Africa
Biodiversity
Canada
International conservation
Terrestrial protected areas
Wildlife population
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2016, 12:35:49 EST by Prof Marc Hockings on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management