High education and increased parity are associated with breast-feeding initiation and duration among Australian women

Holowko, Natalie, Jones, Mark, Koupil, Ilona, Tooth, Leigh and Mishra, Gita (2016) High education and increased parity are associated with breast-feeding initiation and duration among Australian women. Public Health Nutrition, 19 14: 2551-2561. doi:10.1017/S1368980016000367


Author Holowko, Natalie
Jones, Mark
Koupil, Ilona
Tooth, Leigh
Mishra, Gita
Title High education and increased parity are associated with breast-feeding initiation and duration among Australian women
Journal name Public Health Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-2727
1368-9800
Publication date 2016-03-21
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S1368980016000367
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 19
Issue 14
Start page 2551
End page 2561
Total pages 11
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective Breast-feeding is associated with positive maternal and infant health and development outcomes. To assist identifying women less likely to meet infant nutritional guidelines, we investigated the role of socio-economic position and parity on initiation of and sustaining breast-feeding for at least 6 months.

Design Prospective cohort study.

Setting Australia.

Subjects Parous women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (born 1973–78), with self-reported reproductive and breast-feeding history (N 4777).

Results While 89 % of women (83 % of infants) had ever breast-fed, only 60 % of infants were breast-fed for at least 6 months. Multiparous women were more likely to breast-feed their first child (~90 % v. ~71 % of primiparous women), and women who breast-fed their first child were more likely to breast-feed subsequent children. Women with a low education (adjusted OR (95 % CI): 2·09 (1·67, 2·62)) or a very low-educated parent (1·47 (1·16, 1·88)) had increased odds of not initiating breast-feeding with their first or subsequent children. While fewer women initiated breast-feeding with their youngest child, this was most pronounced among high-educated women. While ~60 % of women breast-fed their first, second and third child for at least 6 months, low-educated women (first child, adjusted OR (95 % CI): 2·19 (1·79, 2·68)) and women with a very low (1·82 (1·49, 2·22)) or low-educated parent (1·69 (1·33, 2·14)) had increased odds of not breast-feeding for at least 6 months.

Conclusions A greater understanding of barriers to initiating and sustaining breast-feeding, some of which are socio-economic-specific, may assist in reducing inequalities in infant breast-feeding.
Keyword Breast-feeding duration
Breast-feeding initiation
Infant feeding guidelines
Social inequalities
Socio-economic position
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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