The role of contact partners’ gender in moderating the effect of positive contact on intergroup attitudes: a theoretical framework

Techakesari, Pirathat, Louis, Winnifred and Barlow, Fiona Kate (2015) The role of contact partners’ gender in moderating the effect of positive contact on intergroup attitudes: a theoretical framework. Sensoria: A Journal of Mind, Brain, and Culture, 11 1: 16-27. doi:10.7790/sa.v11i1.406


Author Techakesari, Pirathat
Louis, Winnifred
Barlow, Fiona Kate
Title The role of contact partners’ gender in moderating the effect of positive contact on intergroup attitudes: a theoretical framework
Journal name Sensoria: A Journal of Mind, Brain, and Culture
ISSN 2203-8469
Publication date 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.7790/sa.v11i1.406
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 11
Issue 1
Start page 16
End page 27
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hawthorn, VIC, Australia
Publisher Swinburne University of Technology * Faculty of Health, Arts and Design
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Decades of research have indicated that positive contact with sexual minorities is reliably associated with reduced sexual prejudice among heterosexuals (see Pettigrew & Tropp, 2006; Smith, Axelton, & Saucier, 2009). Despite this extensive literature, the gender of contact partners has been largely overlooked. In the present article, we propose a novel theoretical framework to argue that the relationship between positive contact and intergroup attitudes may vary as functions of the gender of the heterosexual contact partners (i.e., heterosexual men versus heterosexual women) and the gender of the sexual minority contact partners (i.e., gay men versus lesbian women). Drawing on research examining core moderators of contact effects (Hodson, 2011; Hodson, Costello, & MacInnis, 2013) and gender differences in attitudes toward gay men and lesbian women (Herek, 2000a; Kite & Whitley, 1996; LaMar & Kite, 1998), we contend that for heterosexual men, positive contact with gay men might be more effective in improving intergroup attitudes than positive contact with lesbian women. Conversely, for heterosexual women, the beneficial effect of positive contact with lesbian women might be more pronounced than the beneficial effect of positive contact with gay men. We also propose that attitudes toward gender-role violations, knowledge about the out-group, empathy, and intergroup anxiety should emerge as the key mediators of the positive contact-intergroup attitudes relationship.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 03 Apr 2016, 13:19:14 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology