The stress-buffering effects of hope on changes in adjustment to caregiving in multiple sclerosis

Madan, Sindia and Pakenham, Kenneth I. (2015) The stress-buffering effects of hope on changes in adjustment to caregiving in multiple sclerosis. Journal of Health Psychology, 20 9: 1207-1221. doi:10.1177/1359105313509868


Author Madan, Sindia
Pakenham, Kenneth I.
Title The stress-buffering effects of hope on changes in adjustment to caregiving in multiple sclerosis
Journal name Journal of Health Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1461-7277
1359-1053
Publication date 2015-09-26
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1359105313509868
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 20
Issue 9
Start page 1207
End page 1221
Total pages 15
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract This study examined the direct and stress-buffering effects of global hope and its components (agency and pathways) on changes in adjustment to multiple sclerosis caregiving over 12 months. A total of 140 carers and their care-recipients completed questionnaires at Time 1 and 12 months later, Time 2. Focal predictors were stress, hope, agency and pathways, and the adjustment outcomes were anxiety, depression, positive affect, positive states of mind and life satisfaction. Results showed that as predicted, greater hope was associated with better adjustment after controlling for the effects of initial adjustment and caregiving and care-recipient illness variables. No stress-buffering effects of hope emerged. Regarding hope components, only the agency dimension emerged as a significant predictor of adjustment. Findings highlight hope as an important protective resource for coping with multiple sclerosis caregiving and underscore the role of agency thinking in this process.
Keyword Adjustment
Carers
Coping
Hope
Multiple sclerosis
Quality of life
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 03 Apr 2016, 12:03:35 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology