Sugar and spice and all things nice: the role of gender stereotypes in jurors’ perceptions of criminal defendants

Strub, Tanya and McKimmie, Blake M. (2015) Sugar and spice and all things nice: the role of gender stereotypes in jurors’ perceptions of criminal defendants. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law, 23 4: 487-498. doi:10.1080/13218719.2015.1080151


Author Strub, Tanya
McKimmie, Blake M.
Title Sugar and spice and all things nice: the role of gender stereotypes in jurors’ perceptions of criminal defendants
Journal name Psychiatry, Psychology and Law   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1321-8719
1934-1687
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13218719.2015.1080151
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 23
Issue 4
Start page 487
End page 498
Total pages 12
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract Female defendants in criminal trials have been evaluated both more harshly and less harshly than their male counterparts. This variation in treatment may be a function of the stereotype (offender or gender) against which the defendant is compared. This study manipulated congruence with offender stereotypes by varying the gender of the defendant (male or female), and congruence with gender stereotypes by varying the defendant's traits (feminine or masculine). The participants (n = 137) read a fictional transcript of a murder case and then gave a verdict and evaluated the case. Male defendants were more likely to be found guilty, and the case for a female defendant was viewed less positively when she was described in masculine (compared to feminine) terms. The findings suggest that male defendants are compared to offender stereotypes while female defendants are compared, at least to some extent, to gender-based stereotypes.
Keyword Defendant gender
Jury decision-making
Social cognition
Stereotypes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 03 Apr 2016, 21:42:47 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology