A preliminary study on the effect of manuka honey on second intention healing of wounds on distal forelimbs in horses

Bischofberger, Andrea S., Dart, Christina M., Perkins, Nigel R. and Dart, Andrew J. (2011) A preliminary study on the effect of manuka honey on second intention healing of wounds on distal forelimbs in horses. Veterinary Surgery, 40 7: 898-902. doi:10.1111/j.1532-950X.2011.00886.x


Author Bischofberger, Andrea S.
Dart, Christina M.
Perkins, Nigel R.
Dart, Andrew J.
Title A preliminary study on the effect of manuka honey on second intention healing of wounds on distal forelimbs in horses
Journal name Veterinary Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0161-3499
1532-950X
Publication date 2011-10-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2011.00886.x
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 40
Issue 7
Start page 898
End page 902
Total pages 5
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To determine the effect of manuka honey on second-intention healing of contaminated, full-thickness skin wounds in horses.

Study Design:
Experimental.

Animals: Adult Standardbred horses (n = 8).

Methods: One wound was created on the dorsomedial aspect of the third metacarpus in both forelimbs, contaminated with feces, and bandaged for 24 hours. Bandages were removed and wounds rinsed with isotonic saline solution. Wounds on 1 limb had manuka honey applied daily (n = 8) whereas wounds on the contralateral limb received no treatment (n = 8). Bandages were replaced and changed daily for 12 days, after which treatment stopped, bandages were removed, leaving wounds open to heal. Wound area was measured 24 hours after wound creation (day 1), then weekly for 8 weeks. Overall time for healing was recorded. Wound area and rate of healing of treated and control wounds were compared statistically.

Results: Treatment with manuka honey decreased wound retraction and treated wounds remained significantly smaller than control wounds until day 42; however, there was no difference in overall healing time between treatment and control wounds.

Conclusions: Treatment with manuka honey reduced wound area by reducing retraction but did not affect overall healing time of full-thickness distal limb wounds using this wound-healing model.
Keyword Manuka honey
Second-intention healing
Wounds
Distal limb wounds
Horses
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 30 Mar 2016, 18:15:41 EST by Nigel Perkins on behalf of School of Veterinary Science