Retrospective study of 103 presumed cases of tick (Ixodes holocyclus) envenomation in the horse

Ruppin, M, Sullivan, S, Coindon, F, Perkins, NR, Lee, L, Jeffcott, LB and Dart, AJ (2012) Retrospective study of 103 presumed cases of tick (Ixodes holocyclus) envenomation in the horse. Australian Veterinary Journal, 90 5: 175-180. doi:10.1111/j.1751-0813.2012.00916.x


Author Ruppin, M
Sullivan, S
Coindon, F
Perkins, NR
Lee, L
Jeffcott, LB
Dart, AJ
Title Retrospective study of 103 presumed cases of tick (Ixodes holocyclus) envenomation in the horse
Formatted title
Retrospective study of 103 presumed cases of tick (Ixodes holocyclus) envenomation in the horse
Journal name Australian Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0423
1751-0813
Publication date 2012-05
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1751-0813.2012.00916.x
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 90
Issue 5
Start page 175
End page 180
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective Review 103 cases of presumed tick envenomation in horses.

Design Retrospective study.

Method Variables, including date of presentation, age, breed, weight, presence of ticks, gait and respiration scores, duration of recumbency, treatment, outcome and complications were recorded. A series of univariable screening tests were performed and used in a multivariable logistic regression model.

Results There were a total of 103 cases affecting 10 breeds, aged between 1 week and 18 years of age. Horses >6 months old and weighing >100 kg had a higher odds of death than those <6 months old and <100 kg. Cases were seen from North Queensland to the central coast of New South Wales and were more likely to present in the warmer months. There was no association between the number of ticks found on an animal and death. Horses with a higher respiratory score had higher odds of dying, but there was no association between gait score and survival. Horses recumbent >120 h after presentation had higher odds of dying. Complications were reported in 35% of horses. The odds ratio for survival was higher for horses receiving >0.5 mL/kg of tick antiserum. Overall, 74% of horses survived. Multivariable modelling was limited by the small sample size.

Conclusion In general, tick envenomation in horses follows the geographic distribution of Ixodes holocyclus. Tick antiserum administered at >0.5 mL/kg increases the odds of survival. It would appear that the complications associated with managing a recumbent horse increase the odds of death.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 30 Mar 2016, 18:02:42 EST by Nigel Perkins on behalf of School of Veterinary Science