Effect of Manuka honey gel on the transforming growth factor β1 and β3 concentrations, bacterial counts and histomorphology of contaminated full-thickness skin wounds in equine distal limbs

Bischofberge, A. S., Dart, C. M., Horadagoda, N., Perkins, N. R., Jeffcott, L. B., Little, C. B. and Dart, A. J. (2016) Effect of Manuka honey gel on the transforming growth factor β1 and β3 concentrations, bacterial counts and histomorphology of contaminated full-thickness skin wounds in equine distal limbs. Australian Veterinary Journal, 94 1-2: 27-34. doi:10.1111/avj.12405


Author Bischofberge, A. S.
Dart, C. M.
Horadagoda, N.
Perkins, N. R.
Jeffcott, L. B.
Little, C. B.
Dart, A. J.
Title Effect of Manuka honey gel on the transforming growth factor β1 and β3 concentrations, bacterial counts and histomorphology of contaminated full-thickness skin wounds in equine distal limbs
Journal name Australian Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-0423
1751-0813
Publication date 2016-01-26
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/avj.12405
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 94
Issue 1-2
Start page 27
End page 34
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective
To investigate the effect of 66% Manuka honey gel on the concentrations of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and TGF-β3, bacterial counts and histomorphology during healing of contaminated equine distal limb wounds.

Methods
In this experimental study of 10 Standardbred horses, five full-thickness skin wounds (2 × 1.5 cm) were created on one metacarpus and six similar wounds were created on the contralateral metacarpus. Wounds were assigned to three groups: non-contaminated control wounds; contaminated control wounds; contaminated wounds treated daily with 1 mL Manuka honey gel topically for 10 days. For the contaminated wounds, faeces were applied for 24 h after wound creation. In five horses wounds were bandaged and in the other five horses wounds were left without a bandage. Biopsies were taken on days 1, 2, 7 and 10 after wounding to evaluate the effects of Manuka honey gel, wound contamination and bandaging on TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 concentrations, aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts, and histomorphology.

Results
Manuka honey gel had no significant effect on TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 concentrations or wound bacterial counts. Manuka honey gel decreased wound inflammation (days 7, 10), increased angiogenesis (days 2, 7, 10), increased fibrosis and collagen organisation (day 7) and increased epithelial hyperplasia (days 7, 10).

Conclusions
Treatment with Manuka honey gel resulted in a more organised granulation tissue bed early in wound repair, which may contribute to enhanced healing of equine distal limb wounds.
Keyword Horses
Manuka honey gel
Transforming growth factor beta
Skin wounds
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 30 Mar 2016, 14:47:34 EST by Nigel Perkins on behalf of School of Veterinary Science