Size variation in Tachyoryctes splendens (East African mole-rat) and its implications for late Quaternary temperature change in equatorial East Africa

Faith, J.Tyler, Patterson, David B., Blegen, Nick, O'Neill, Chris J., Marean, Curtis W., Peppe, Daniel J. and Tryon, Christian A. (2016) Size variation in Tachyoryctes splendens (East African mole-rat) and its implications for late Quaternary temperature change in equatorial East Africa. Quaternary Science Reviews, 140 39-48. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2016.03.017


Author Faith, J.Tyler
Patterson, David B.
Blegen, Nick
O'Neill, Chris J.
Marean, Curtis W.
Peppe, Daniel J.
Tryon, Christian A.
Title Size variation in Tachyoryctes splendens (East African mole-rat) and its implications for late Quaternary temperature change in equatorial East Africa
Formatted title
Size variation in Tachyoryctes splendens (East African mole-rat) and its implications for late Quaternary temperature change in equatorial East Africa
Journal name Quaternary Science Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0277-3791
1873-457X
Publication date 2016-05-15
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.quascirev.2016.03.017
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 140
Start page 39
End page 48
Total pages 10
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study develops a new proxy for Quaternary temperature change in tropical Africa through analysis of size variation in East African mole-rat (Tachyoryctes splendens). In modern mole-rats, mandibular alveolar length is unrelated to annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, temperature seasonality, or primary productivity. However, it is inversely correlated with mean annual temperature, in agreement with Bergmann's rule. This relationship is observed at temperatures below ∼17.3 °C, but not at higher temperatures. We apply these observations to late Quaternary mole-rats from Wakondo (∼100 ka) and Kisaaka (∼50 ka) in the Lake Victoria region and Enkapune ya Muto (EYM; ∼7.2–3.2 ka) in Kenya's central rift. The Lake Victoria mole-rats are larger than expected for populations from warm climates typical of the area today, implying cooler temperatures in the past. The magnitude of temperature decline needed to drive the size shift is substantial (∼4–6 °C), similar in magnitude to the degree of change between the Last Glacial Maximum and Holocene, but is consistent with regional temperature records and with scenarios linking equatorial African temperature to northern hemisphere summer insolation. Size changes through time at EYM indicate that rising temperatures during the middle Holocene accompanied and potentially contributed to a decline in Lake Naivasha and expansion of grassland vegetation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 29 Mar 2016, 08:17:36 EST by Tyler Faith on behalf of School of Social Science