The structural-personal interaction: occupational deprivation and asylum seekers in Australia

Crawford, Emma, Turpin, Merrill, Nayar, Shoba, Steel, Emily and Durand, Jean-Louis (2016) The structural-personal interaction: occupational deprivation and asylum seekers in Australia. Journal of Occupational Science, 23 3: 321-338. doi:10.1080/14427591.2016.1153510


Author Crawford, Emma
Turpin, Merrill
Nayar, Shoba
Steel, Emily
Durand, Jean-Louis
Title The structural-personal interaction: occupational deprivation and asylum seekers in Australia
Journal name Journal of Occupational Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2158-1576
1442-7591
Publication date 2016-03
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14427591.2016.1153510
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 23
Issue 3
Start page 321
End page 338
Total pages 18
Place of publication Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Publisher Taylor & Francis Australasia
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Asylum seekers experience occupational deprivation in the context of restrictive social structures while awaiting refugee visa-status determination. How do social structures of citizenship status and policy shape asylum seekers’ experiences? Asylum seekers’ experiences in Australia are examined using constructivist grounded theory. Field notes from 10 months of weekly participant observation, 11 formal interviews, 34 survey responses and four policy documents are combined to identify a substantive theory - the Structural-Personal Interaction (SPI). The SPI explains how occupational deprivation arises from an interaction between social structures and personal characteristics. Social structures of citizenship status and policy interact with asylum seekers’ personal characteristics, resulting in experiences of “having nothing to do”, a fundamental component of occupational deprivation. From the SPI, new insights regarding occupational deprivation emerge. Occupational deprivation can stem from an interaction between social structures and personal characteristics. While the SPI is a substantive theory and further research across a range of settings would be beneficial for its generalization, occupational deprivation's structural roots and connections to human vulnerabilities and resilience are discernable when considered in light of the SPI. Strategies to address occupational deprivation might target changes to social structures as well as build on individual strengths and human diversity.
Keyword Asylum seekers
Occupational deprivation
Occupational justice
Qualitative research
Refugees
Social structures
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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