Friends with moral credentials: minority friendships reduce attributions of racism for majority group members who make conceivably racist statements

Thai, Michael, Hornsey, Matthew J. and Barlow, Fiona Kate (2016) Friends with moral credentials: minority friendships reduce attributions of racism for majority group members who make conceivably racist statements. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 7 3: 272-280. doi:10.1177/1948550615624140


Author Thai, Michael
Hornsey, Matthew J.
Barlow, Fiona Kate
Title Friends with moral credentials: minority friendships reduce attributions of racism for majority group members who make conceivably racist statements
Journal name Social Psychological and Personality Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1948-5514
1948-5506
Publication date 2016-04-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1948550615624140
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 7
Issue 3
Start page 272
End page 280
Total pages 9
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher SAGE Publications
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract People commonly reference minority friendships when expressing conceivably prejudiced attitudes. The prevalence of this strategy suggests a widespread belief that having minority friends makes one look less racist, but to date, there is little research demonstrating whether or not this is the case. White and Asian participants were presented with a Facebook profile depicting a White target who posted an anti-Asian statement. Being depicted with Asian friends (Study 1) or even verbally claiming that they had Asian friends (Study 2) reduced attributions of racism irrespective of whether they were being evaluated by White or Asian observers. Furthermore, the presence of Asian friends made the conceivably racist comments seem relatively benign, and observers were less offended and upset by them. The data suggest that minority friendships can partially offset costs associated with expressing prejudice.
Keyword Attribution
Moral credentials
Person perception
Racism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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