Tropical secondary forests regenerating after shifting cultivation in the Philippines uplands are important carbon sinks

Mukul, Sharif A., Herbohn, John and Firn, Jennifer (2016) Tropical secondary forests regenerating after shifting cultivation in the Philippines uplands are important carbon sinks. Scientific Reports, 6 22483.1-22483.12. doi:10.1038/srep22483


Author Mukul, Sharif A.
Herbohn, John
Firn, Jennifer
Title Tropical secondary forests regenerating after shifting cultivation in the Philippines uplands are important carbon sinks
Journal name Scientific Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2045-2322
Publication date 2016-03-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/srep22483
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Start page 22483.1
End page 22483.12
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, UK
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract In the tropics, shifting cultivation has long been attributed to large scale forest degradation, and remains a major source of uncertainty in forest carbon accounting. In the Philippines, shifting cultivation, locally known as kaingin, is a major land-use in upland areas. We measured the distribution and recovery of aboveground biomass carbon along a fallow gradient in post-kaingin secondary forests in an upland area in the Philippines. We found significantly higher carbon in the aboveground total biomass and living woody biomass in old-growth forest, while coarse dead wood biomass carbon was higher in the new fallow sites. For young through to the oldest fallow secondary forests, there was a progressive recovery of biomass carbon evident. Multivariate analysis indicates patch size as an influential factor in explaining the variation in biomass carbon recovery in secondary forests after shifting cultivation. Our study indicates secondary forests after shifting cultivation are substantial carbon sinks and that this capacity to store carbon increases with abandonment age. Large trees contribute most to aboveground biomass. A better understanding of the relative contribution of different biomass sources in aboveground total forest biomass, however, is necessary to fully capture the value of such landscapes from forest management, restoration and conservation perspectives.
Keyword Forest ecology
Forestry
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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