Different stimulation frequencies alter synchronous fluctuations in motor evoked potential amplitude of intrinsic hand muscles- a TMS study

Sale, Martin V., Rogasch, Nigel C. and Nordstrom, Michael A. (2016) Different stimulation frequencies alter synchronous fluctuations in motor evoked potential amplitude of intrinsic hand muscles- a TMS study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10 MAR2016: e100.1-e100.9. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2016.00100


Author Sale, Martin V.
Rogasch, Nigel C.
Nordstrom, Michael A.
Title Different stimulation frequencies alter synchronous fluctuations in motor evoked potential amplitude of intrinsic hand muscles- a TMS study
Journal name Frontiers in Human Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1662-5161
Publication date 2016-03-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00100
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue MAR2016
Start page e100.1
End page e100.9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) varies from trial-to-trial. Synchronous oscillations in cortical neuronal excitability contribute to this variability, however it is not known how different frequencies of stimulation influence MEP variability, and whether these oscillations are rhythmic or aperiodic. We stimulated the motor cortex with TMS at different regular (i.e., rhythmic) rates, and compared this with pseudo-random (aperiodic) timing. In 18 subjects, TMS was applied at three regular frequencies (0.05 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 1 Hz) and one aperiodic frequency (mean 0.2 Hz). MEPs (n = 50) were recorded from three intrinsic hand muscles of the left hand with different functional and anatomical relations. MEP amplitude correlation was highest for the functionally related muscle pair, less for the anatomically related muscle pair and least for the functionally- and anatomically-unrelated muscle pair. MEP correlations were greatest with 1 Hz, and least for stimulation at 0.05 Hz. Corticospinal neuron synchrony is higher with shorter TMS intervals. Further, corticospinal neuron synchrony is similar irrespective of whether the stimulation is periodic or aperiodic. These findings suggest TMS frequency is a crucial consideration for studies using TMS to probe correlated activity between muscle pairs.
Keyword Transcranial magnetic stimulation
Cortical oscillations
Motor-evoked potential
Motor cortex
First dorsal interosseous
Abductor pollicis brevis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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