Interactions of uroseptic escherichia coli with renal (A-498) and gastrointestinal (HT-29) cell lines

Vollmerhausen, Tara L., Woods, Jasmine L., Faoagali, Joan and Katouli, Mohammad (2014) Interactions of uroseptic escherichia coli with renal (A-498) and gastrointestinal (HT-29) cell lines. Journal of Medical Microbiology, 63 1575-1583. doi:10.1099/jmm.0.076562-0


Author Vollmerhausen, Tara L.
Woods, Jasmine L.
Faoagali, Joan
Katouli, Mohammad
Title Interactions of uroseptic escherichia coli with renal (A-498) and gastrointestinal (HT-29) cell lines
Formatted title
Interactions of uroseptic escherichia coli with renal (A-498) and gastrointestinal (HT-29) cell lines
Journal name Journal of Medical Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-2615
1473-5644
Publication date 2014-12-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1099/jmm.0.076562-0
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 63
Start page 1575
End page 1583
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Society for General Microbiology
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We investigated the ability of Escherichia coli isolated from septic patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) to translocate through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the same patients using cell-culture models. Forty-seven hospitalized patients with urosepsis were included in this study. E. coli was isolated from their urine and blood (total 94 isolates) and investigated for genetic relatedness and interaction with the cell lines A-498 and HT-29. An initial comparison of the strains isolated from urine and blood showed that 44 out of 47 patients (94 %) had identical strains in their blood and urine. The blood isolates adhered to both cell lines, although their rate of adherence to A-498 cells was significantly higher than that to HT-29 cells (5.8±3.8 per cell vs 2.8±1.9; P<0.0001). The rate of translocation in A-498 cells was also significantly higher after 120 min (8.7×105 vs 2.9×105; P = 0.0006). Three non-identical blood isolates were unable to translocate in HT-29 cells, indicating that host immune factors might be more important than bacterial ability to translocate the GI epithelium in these patients. Our data showed that blood isolates from uroseptic patients are able to adhere to and translocate through both cell lines. This suggests that E. coli in patients with UTI may translocate from either the GI tract or the urinary tract, hence questioning the assumption that the urinary tract is the only source of septicaemia in these patients.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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