The effects of student violence against school employees on employee burnout and work engagement: the roles of perceived school unsafety and transformational leadership

Bass, Benjamin I., Cigularov, Konstantin P., Chen, Peter Y., Henry, Kimberly L., Tomazic, Rocco G. and Li, Yiqiong (2016) The effects of student violence against school employees on employee burnout and work engagement: the roles of perceived school unsafety and transformational leadership. International Journal of Stress Management, 23 3: 318-336. doi:10.1037/str0000011


Author Bass, Benjamin I.
Cigularov, Konstantin P.
Chen, Peter Y.
Henry, Kimberly L.
Tomazic, Rocco G.
Li, Yiqiong
Title The effects of student violence against school employees on employee burnout and work engagement: the roles of perceived school unsafety and transformational leadership
Journal name International Journal of Stress Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1072-5245
1573-3424
Publication date 2016-08
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/str0000011
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 23
Issue 3
Start page 318
End page 336
Total pages 19
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Victimization of school staff by students is a serious topic that receives scant attention. In this study, we quantified acts of student violence against school staff in one large school district in the Northeastern U.S. and examined the extent to which this type of victimization is associated with burnout and work engagement. We also examined a potential mediator (staff members’ perceptions of safety at school) and moderator (staff member’s perceptions of school leadership) of the relationship between victimization and both burnout and work engagement. These research questions were considered using cross-sectional, self-report data from 728 employees who responded to an anonymous, online survey. Consistent with our hypotheses, victimization was positively associated with burnout and negatively associated with work engagement. In addition, staff perceptions of school unsafety partially mediated the relationship between victimization and both burnout and work engagement, whereas transformational leadership buffered the effect of student violence against school employees on perceived school unsafety and work engagement. These results support the notion that student violence against school employees can be considered a job demand, whereas transformational leadership may act as a job resource. Moreover, our findings suggest that workplace safety perceptions can be a mediating mechanism between job demands and well-being outcomes.
Keyword Burnout
Job demands–resources model
Student violence
Transformational leadership
Work engagement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 24 Mar 2016, 12:55:36 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School