Defoliation patterns and their implications for the management of vegetative tropical pastures to control intake and diet quality by cattle

Benvenutti, M. A., Pavetti, D. R., Poppi, D. P., Gordon, I. J. and Cangiano, C. A. (2015) Defoliation patterns and their implications for the management of vegetative tropical pastures to control intake and diet quality by cattle. Grass and Forage Science, 71 3: 424-436. doi:10.1111/gfs.12186


Author Benvenutti, M. A.
Pavetti, D. R.
Poppi, D. P.
Gordon, I. J.
Cangiano, C. A.
Title Defoliation patterns and their implications for the management of vegetative tropical pastures to control intake and diet quality by cattle
Journal name Grass and Forage Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0142-5242
1365-2494
Publication date 2015
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/gfs.12186
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 71
Issue 3
Start page 424
End page 436
Total pages 13
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study assessed the use of pasture attributes to control daily intake and diet quality during progressive defoliation on pastures of Axonopus catarinensis. Three consecutive 12-day grazing treatments of progressive defoliation were conducted with Brahman cross-steers. Daily forage intake and defoliation dynamics were assessed using a pasture-based method. The treatments differed in initial sward height (33, 44 and 61 cm) and herbage mass (1030, 1740 and 2240 kg ha−1). The post-grazing residual sward height, at which forage intake decreased, appeared to increase with the initial sward height (12·3, 14·6 and 15·5 cm). Steers grazed up to four distinctive grazing strata in all treatments. The depth and herbage mass content of the top grazing stratum were at least five times higher than the lower grazing strata in all treatments. This explains why forage intake decreased when the top grazing stratum was removed in approximately 93% of the pasture area in all treatments, equivalent to approximately 7% of the pasture area remaining ungrazed. We conclude that the residual ungrazed area of the pasture, rather than residual sward height, can be used to develop grazing management strategies to control forage intake and diet quality in a wide range of pasture conditions.
Keyword Grazing management
Forage intake
Diet quality
Defoliation dynamics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2016 Collection
 
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Created: Thu, 24 Mar 2016, 10:40:56 EST by Karen Harper on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences