Reducing general practice trainees’ antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and on-line educational intervention

Magin, Parker J., Morgan, Simon, Tapley, Amanda, Davis, Joshua S., McArthur, Lawrie, Henderson, Kim M., Mulquiney, Katie J., Dallas, Anthea, Davey, Andrew R., Scott, John and van Driel, Mieke L. (2016) Reducing general practice trainees’ antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and on-line educational intervention. Education for Primary Care, 27 2: 98-105. doi:10.1080/14739879.2015.1106085


Author Magin, Parker J.
Morgan, Simon
Tapley, Amanda
Davis, Joshua S.
McArthur, Lawrie
Henderson, Kim M.
Mulquiney, Katie J.
Dallas, Anthea
Davey, Andrew R.
Scott, John
van Driel, Mieke L.
Title Reducing general practice trainees’ antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and on-line educational intervention
Journal name Education for Primary Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-9879
1475-990X
Publication date 2016
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14739879.2015.1106085
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 27
Issue 2
Start page 98
End page 105
Total pages 8
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The ‘apprenticeship’ educational model and the trainee–trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars’ non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars’ intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar’s test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors’ intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, sore throat and three acute bronchitis vignettes). We found that, for registrars, there were statistically significant reductions in antibiotic prescribing for the sore throat (24.0% absolute reduction), otitis media (17.5% absolute reduction) and two of the three acute bronchitis (12.0% and 18.0% absolute reduction) vignettes. There were significant reductions in supervisors’ antibiotic prescribing intentions for the same four vignettes. We conclude that our intervention produced a significant change in registrars’ intention to prescribe antibiotics for non-pneumonia RTIs.
Keyword Antibacterial agents
Family practice
Respiratory tract infections
Bronchitis
Physician prescribing patterns
Education
Medical
Graduate
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Discipline of General Practice Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 23 Mar 2016, 11:18:29 EST by Mrs Carolyn Hinds-Edwards on behalf of Discipline of General Practice