'Depression is not an illness. It's up to you to make yourself happy': Perceptions of Chinese health professionals and community workers about older Chinese immigrants' experiences of depression and anxiety

Haralambous, Betty, Dow, Briony, Goh, Anita, Pachana, Nancy A., Bryant, Christina, Logiudice, Dina and Lin, Xiaoping (2016) 'Depression is not an illness. It's up to you to make yourself happy': Perceptions of Chinese health professionals and community workers about older Chinese immigrants' experiences of depression and anxiety. Australasian Journal on Ageing, . doi:10.1111/ajag.12306


Author Haralambous, Betty
Dow, Briony
Goh, Anita
Pachana, Nancy A.
Bryant, Christina
Logiudice, Dina
Lin, Xiaoping
Title 'Depression is not an illness. It's up to you to make yourself happy': Perceptions of Chinese health professionals and community workers about older Chinese immigrants' experiences of depression and anxiety
Journal name Australasian Journal on Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1741-6612
1440-6381
Publication date 2016-03-11
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ajag.12306
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim: The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of depression and anxiety among older immigrant Chinese Australians.

Method: The study was based on the National Ageing Research Institute's Cultural Exchange Model, an iterative process of exchange between researchers and stakeholders. The project involved a range of components including consultations with health professionals and community workers about perceptions of depression and anxiety within the Chinese community. This paper reports on these consultation findings.

Results: Thematic analysis generated five main categories to explain participants' perceptions of depression and anxiety within the Chinese community. Themes included: lack of knowledge; personal weakness rather than illness; stigma; somatisation; and experience of migration in later life. Responses to questions about education and information dissemination were collated separately and reported.

Conclusion: Views of depression and anxiety among older Chinese people suggest that educating the community may be an important way to improve mental health literacy and help-seeking behaviour.
Keyword Anxiety
Depression
Older Chinese immigrant
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Mar 2016, 01:27:26 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)