Enhanced risk of illness during the 1918 influenza pandemic after previous influenza-like illnesses in three military populations

Shanks, G.D., Burroughs, S.A., Sohn, J.D., Waters, N.C., Smith, V.F., Waller, M. and Brundage, J.F. (2016) Enhanced risk of illness during the 1918 influenza pandemic after previous influenza-like illnesses in three military populations. Epidemiology and Infection, 144 10: 2043-2048. doi:10.1017/S0950268816000479


Author Shanks, G.D.
Burroughs, S.A.
Sohn, J.D.
Waters, N.C.
Smith, V.F.
Waller, M.
Brundage, J.F.
Title Enhanced risk of illness during the 1918 influenza pandemic after previous influenza-like illnesses in three military populations
Journal name Epidemiology and Infection   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-4409
0950-2688
Publication date 2016-07
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0950268816000479
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 144
Issue 10
Start page 2043
End page 2048
Total pages 6
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The reasons for the unprecedented mortality during the 1918 influenza pandemic remain poorly understood. We examined morbidity records from three military cohorts from years prior to and during the 1918 pandemic period to assess the effects of previous respiratory illnesses on experiences during the pandemic. Clinical registers and morbidity lists were examined to identify all medical encounters for acute respiratory illnesses in students at two U.S. military officer training academies and Australian soldiers deployed in Europe. Influenza-like illness prior to the major pandemic wave of 1918 predisposed Australian soldiers [relative risk (RR) 1·37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·18–1·60, P < 0·0001] and US officer trainees at West Point (RR 3·10, 95% CI 2·13–4·52, P < 0·0001) and Annapolis (RR 2·03, 95% CI 1·65–2·50, P < 0·0001) to increased risks of medically treated illnesses in late 1918. The findings suggest that susceptibility to and/or clinical expressions of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus depended on previous experiences with respiratory infectious agents. The findings are consistent with observations during the 2009 pandemic in Canada and may reflect antibody-dependent enhancement of influenza infection.
Keyword 1918 pandemic
Influenza
Military
Mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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