The role of the gastrointestinal tract and microbiota on uremic toxins and chronic kidney disease development

Briskey, David, Tucker, Patrick, Johnson, David W. and Coombes, Jeff S. (2016) The role of the gastrointestinal tract and microbiota on uremic toxins and chronic kidney disease development. Clinical and Experimental Nephrology, . doi:10.1007/s10157-016-1255-y


Author Briskey, David
Tucker, Patrick
Johnson, David W.
Coombes, Jeff S.
Title The role of the gastrointestinal tract and microbiota on uremic toxins and chronic kidney disease development
Journal name Clinical and Experimental Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1437-7799
1342-1751
Publication date 2016-03-10
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10157-016-1255-y
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Total pages 9
Place of publication Tokyo, Japan
Publisher Nihon Jinzo Gakkai / Japanese Society of Nephrology
Collection year 2017
Formatted abstract
It is well-established that uremic toxins are positively correlated with the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. In addition, emerging data suggest that gut bacteria exert an influence over both the production of uremic toxins and the development of chronic kidney disease. As such, modifying the gut microbiota may have the potential as a treatment for chronic kidney disease. This is supported by data that suggest that rescuing microbiota dysbiosis may: reduce uremic toxin production; prevent toxins and pathogens from crossing the intestinal barrier; and, reduce gastrointestinal tract transit time allowing nutrients to reach the microbiota in the distal portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite emerging literature, the gut–kidney axis has yet to be fully explored. A special focus should be placed on examining clinically translatable strategies that might encourage improvements to the microbiome, thereby potentially reducing the risk of the development of chronic kidney disease. This review aims to present an overview of literature linking changes to the gastrointestinal tract with microbiota dysbiosis and the development and progression of chronic kidney disease.
Keyword Gastrointestinal tract
Kidney disease
Microbiota
Permeability
Probiotics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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