Improved trigger action response plan development based upon mine-specific data

Belle, B. and Cliff, D. (2015). Improved trigger action response plan development based upon mine-specific data. In: Proceedings The Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2015. Australian Mine Ventilation Conference, Sydney, Australia, (73-78). 31 August - 3 September 2015.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Belle, B.
Cliff, D.
Title of paper Improved trigger action response plan development based upon mine-specific data
Conference name Australian Mine Ventilation Conference
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 31 August - 3 September 2015
Convener AusIMM
Proceedings title Proceedings The Australian Mine Ventilation Conference 2015
Place of Publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher AusIMM: Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Publication Year 2015
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status Not Open Access
ISBN 9781925100341
9781925100358
Start page 73
End page 78
Total pages 6
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Trigger action response plans (TARPs) are inherent to managing multiple hazards such as high gas content with multiple coal seams, high spontaneous combustion propensity, heat and ventilation. TARPs aim to provide assurance and guidance when the situation deviates from the original plan or there is a change in conditions that could be hazardous. Over the years, learnings from various incidents have continuously required coal operations to revisit the TARP trigger values that were based on historical data or guidance values from the industry. In most cases, the background to the basis of TARP statistical data (ie average, maximum, hourly or daily for the monitoring or sampling location) is unknown. The introduction of real-time monitoring devices to monitor gases and airflows has provided greater understanding of the hazard scenarios and their controls. This paper analyses the carbon monoxide data from operating longwall mines and compares these with the historical trigger values to understand the changes and identify improvement opportunities while setting trigger levels in the TARPs. As an example of setting trigger values, those used during the sealing of a panel are explored in terms of setting values based upon the sampling location and the level of risk. It is envisaged that the learnings shared herein will further enhance the understanding and management of multiple hazards in Australian coalmines.
Keyword Ventilation
TARPS
Coal mining
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre Publications
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Created: Mon, 21 Mar 2016, 16:08:50 EST by David Cliff on behalf of Minerals Industry Safety and Health Centre