The effect of crash scenario generation tasks and commentary driver training exercises on driver hazard perception

Owen, Patrick (2015). The effect of crash scenario generation tasks and commentary driver training exercises on driver hazard perception Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Owen, Patrick
Thesis Title The effect of crash scenario generation tasks and commentary driver training exercises on driver hazard perception
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Mark Horswill
Total pages 73
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
A factor that has been shown to consistently predict the likelihood of an individual’s involvement in a road traffic accident is their hazard perception ability; this ability has been found previously to be amenable to training. In a past study investigating driver motivation to engage in hazard perception training, it was discovered that when two driving-related tasks were applied within a single training session, participants experienced an enhanced hazard perception training effect. These two tasks were: (1) the crash scenario generation task, normally used to reduce the self-enhancement bias drivers hold towards their own driving ability, and; (2) commentary driver training exercises, used to reduce the hazard response latencies of drivers and improve their hazard perception abilities. The present study sought to identify whether the crash scenario generation task amplified the training effect of the commentary driver training exercises, or whether the crash scenario generation task had its own independent training effect that added to the overall training effect. Four intervention groups were made to measure the training effects of each driving-related task individually and when combined, against a full-control group. Primarily, it was predicted that participants in the intervention group receiving both of the tasks would experience a significantly greater reduction in hazard perception response latency times compared to the other intervention groups, and that the nature of this training effect would be dependent on whether or not the crash scenario generation task reported an independent training effect. Additionally, it was predicted that only groups exposed to the commentary driver training exercises and crash scenario generation task would experience significant reductions in response latencies and self-ratings, respectively. Contrary to predictions, all four intervention groups experienced similar, significant training effects, and no group experienced a decrease in self-ratings. Possible reasons and implications for these findings are discussed, along with limitations and directions for future research.
Keyword Crash
Driver
Hazard

 
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Created: Thu, 17 Mar 2016, 14:24:03 EST by Lisa Perry on behalf of School of Psychology