Insights into health discipline students' perceptions of identity, stereotype and interdisciplinary communication: a pilot study

Cameron, Emma (2015). Insights into health discipline students' perceptions of identity, stereotype and interdisciplinary communication: a pilot study Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Cameron, Emma
Thesis Title Insights into health discipline students' perceptions of identity, stereotype and interdisciplinary communication: a pilot study
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Bernadette Watson
Total pages 108
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
Within the complex hierarchical environment of the hospital, group identities, stereotyping and communication attitudes health professional communication in interdisciplinary and interdepartmental interactions, and in interactions of differential seniority. The effects of Social Identity Theory and Stereotype Content Model concepts such as social identities and intergroup differentiation and outgroup stereotyping underpin the frequent communication failures that occur. While the body of research on interdisciplinary communication is growing, little investigation has been conducted into the identity, stereotype and communication attitudes in health discipline students. In this study, the identity, stereotype and communication attitudes of first year medical, nursing and midwifery students were explored. It was found that students already identified strongly with their own student groups, and moderately with their respective professional groups. Further, significant differences were found in competence and warmth stereotypes between the three health disciplines. Importantly, all student groups recognised the value of communication skills for their chosen professions. Details of these findings, implications and future research options were discussed.
Keyword Health
Student
Identity
Stereotype
Communication

 
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Created: Thu, 17 Mar 2016, 09:50:31 EST by Stephanie Kerr on behalf of School of Psychology