Framing palm oil and its consequences: The role of emotion

Burgess, Amelia (2015). Framing palm oil and its consequences: The role of emotion Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Burgess, Amelia
Thesis Title Framing palm oil and its consequences: The role of emotion
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Kelly Fielding
Total pages 92
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
The unsustainable production of palm oil is having devastating consequences on the forests of Malaysia and Indonesia. While governments, manufacturers and the palm oil industry have a role to play in addressing this issue, the current study was interested in how individual consumers might make a difference. In particular, the study examined whether framing information about palm oil to elicit emotions of guilt or empathy could be an effective way to increase concern, intentions and behaviour compared to factual information or no information about palm oil. Participants (N = 189) were randomly assigned to one of four framing conditions (guilt, empathy, information control, no information control) and knowledge about palm oil and animal welfare values were measured as potential moderators of the framing effect. Results showed no main effects of the framing conditions on the dependent variables (concern, intentions, behaviour). However, knowledge about palm oil moderated the framing effect on concern, whereby participants who had little prior knowledge about palm oil were more likely to be concerned about its impacts when they were in a condition that received information compared to the condition that did not receive information. Animal welfare values moderated the framing effect on behaviour, such that participants with low animal welfare values were more likely to engage in behaviour to address unsustainable palm oil when they were in a condition that received information compared to the condition that did not receive information condition. The implications of these results are discussed.
Keyword Palm oil
Emotion

 
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Created: Thu, 17 Mar 2016, 08:33:17 EST by Stephanie Kerr on behalf of School of Psychology