On the nature of symbolic and non-symbolic fraction representations in the brain

Bagnall, Jessica (2015). On the nature of symbolic and non-symbolic fraction representations in the brain Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Bagnall, Jessica
Thesis Title On the nature of symbolic and non-symbolic fraction representations in the brain
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Paul Dux
Total pages 139
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
Previous research has examined whether symbolic and non-symbolic numbers, such as numerals and clusters of dot numerosities are represented the same, or differently within the brain. However, very little research has been conducted on how fractions are represented within the brain. Particularly, whether symbolic, such as numeral fractions like 1/2 and non-symbolic fractions, such as half of a pizza, are represented similarly or dissimilarly. The present experiment aims to determine how symbolic and non-symbolic fractions are represented using electroencephalography and pattern classification analyses. Participants compared pairs of either numeral fractions (symbolic), or dot fractions (non-symbolic), and made judgments about which fraction was larger. Using the patterns of activation exhibited through EEG signals, it was determined that non-symbolic and symbolic fractions are represented in distinctly different ways within the brain. This is the first experiment of its kind to examine symbolic vs. non-symbolic fraction representation within the brain, and has provided a foundation for future research in this field.
Keyword Symbolic
Representation
Brain

 
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Created: Wed, 16 Mar 2016, 15:02:26 EST by Stephanie Kerr on behalf of School of Psychology