Drinking will help me: An investigation of the relationship between causal uncertainty and desire to drink

Wanigasooriya, Angela (2015). Drinking will help me: An investigation of the relationship between causal uncertainty and desire to drink Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Wanigasooriya, Angela
Thesis Title Drinking will help me: An investigation of the relationship between causal uncertainty and desire to drink
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2015-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Stephanie Tobin
Total pages 60
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Formatted abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between individuals’ level of causal uncertainty and their desire to drink. This was achieved by examining individuals’ beliefs about how alcohol affects their causal reasoning, and whether these beliefs predict their desire to drink after encountering unexpected, negative social interactions. Participants were191undergraduate psychology students who firstly completed measures of causal uncertainty, beliefs about how alcohol affects causal thinking, depression, anxiety, social anxiety, general alcohol metacognitions, and typical alcohol consumption. They were then randomly assigned to receive either an ambiguous or control scenario. Finally, participants were asked to indicate what their desire to drink would be if the scenario they read had just happened to them. As predicted, the higher participants’ level of causal uncertainty, the greater their desire to drink was. Also as predicted, the causal disengagement metacognition mediated the positive association between causal uncertainty and desire to drink. However, the hypothesis that the causal enhancement metacognition would mediate the association between causal uncertainty and desire to drink was not supported. Furthermore, the hypothesis that event expectancy would moderate the association between causal uncertainty and desire to drink was not supported. Exploratory analyses revealed that broader alcohol-related metacognitions did not mediate the association between causal uncertainty and desire to drink either. Despite these results, the finding that the causal disengagement metacognition mediated the association between causal uncertainty and desire to drink provides a novel contribution to the causal uncertainty literature in relation to alcohol consumption. It also has important practical implications for public health agencies who are trying to reduce alcohol-related problems.
Keyword Drinking
Uncertainty
Desire

 
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Created: Wed, 16 Mar 2016, 13:26:03 EST by Lisa Perry on behalf of School of Psychology