Circadian modulation of complex learning in diurnal and nocturnal Aplysia

Lyon, Lisa C., Rawashdeh, Oliver, Katzoff, Ayelet, Susswein, Abraham J. and Eskin, Arnold (2005) Circadian modulation of complex learning in diurnal and nocturnal Aplysia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102 35: 12589-12594. doi:10.1073/pnas.0503847102


Author Lyon, Lisa C.
Rawashdeh, Oliver
Katzoff, Ayelet
Susswein, Abraham J.
Eskin, Arnold
Title Circadian modulation of complex learning in diurnal and nocturnal Aplysia
Formatted title
Circadian modulation of complex learning in diurnal and nocturnal Aplysia
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2005-08-30
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0503847102
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 102
Issue 35
Start page 12589
End page 12594
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Understanding modulation of memory, as well as the mechanisms underlying memory formation, has become a key issue in neuroscience research. Previously, we found that the formation of long-term, but not short-term, memory for a nonassociative form of learning, sensitization, was modulated by the circadian clock in the diurnal Aplysia californica. To define the scope of circadian modulation of memory, we examined an associative operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible (LFI). Significantly greater long-term memory of LFI occurred when A. californica were trained and tested during the subjective day, compared with animals trained and tested in the subjective night. In contrast, animals displayed similar levels of short-term memory for LFI when trained in either the subjective day or night. Circadian modulation of long-term memory for LFI was dependent on the time of training, rather than the time of testing. To broaden our investigation of circadian modulation of memory, we extended our studies to a nocturnal species, Aplysia fasciata. Contrary to the significant memory observed during the day with the diurnal A. californica, A. fasciata showed no long-term memory for LFI when trained during the day. However, A. fasciata demonstrated significant long-term memory when trained and tested during the night. Thus, the circadian clock modulates memory formation in phase with the animals' activity period. The results from our studies of circadian modulation of long-term sensitization and LFI suggest that circadian modulation of memory formation may be a general phenomenon with potentially widespread implications for many types of long-term learning.
Keyword Biological rhythms
Circadian clock
Long-term memory
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 16 Mar 2016, 08:56:09 EST by Oliver Rawashdeh on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)