The use of food waste as a carbon source for on-site treatment of nutrient-rich blackwater from an office block

Tannock, Simon J. C. and Clarke, William P. (2016) The use of food waste as a carbon source for on-site treatment of nutrient-rich blackwater from an office block. Environmental Technology (United Kingdom), 37 18: 2368-2378. doi:10.1080/09593330.2016.1150351


Author Tannock, Simon J. C.
Clarke, William P.
Title The use of food waste as a carbon source for on-site treatment of nutrient-rich blackwater from an office block
Journal name Environmental Technology (United Kingdom)   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1479-487X
0959-3330
Publication date 2016-02-25
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09593330.2016.1150351
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 37
Issue 18
Start page 2368
End page 2378
Total pages 11
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Wastewater from office blocks is typically dominated by blackwater and is therefore concentrated and nutrient-rich. A pilot plant was operated for 260 days, receiving 300 L d−1 of wastewater directly from an office building to determine whether nutrient removal could be achieved using food waste (FW) as a supplemental carbon source. The pilot plant consisted of a 600 L prefermenter and a 600 L membrane bioreactor that was operated as a sequential batch reactor in order to cycle through anoxic, anaerobic and aerobic phases. The influent wastewater Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD)/N/P was, on average, 1438/275/40 mg L−1, considerably higher than typical municipal wastewater. Treatment trials on the wastewater alone showed that the COD was only marginally sufficient to exhaust nitrate, and initiate anaerobic conditions required for phosphate removal. The addition of 15 kg d−1 of macerated FW increased the average influent COD/N/P concentrations to 20,072/459/66 mg L−1. The suitability of FW as a carbon source was demonstrated by denitrification to NOx-N concentration of <1 mg L−1 during the biological nutrient removal (BNR) cycles. N removal was limited by nitrification. FW also induced the anaerobic phase within the BNR cycles necessary for P removal. The final average COD (non-recalcitrant)/N/P effluent concentrations under FW supplementation were 7/50/13 mg L−1 which equates to 99%, 89% and 80% COD/N/P removal, respectively, meeting the highest nutrient removal efficiency standards stipulated by state jurisdictions for on-site systems in the USA.
Keyword Biological nutrient removal
Blackwater
Decentralized treatment
Food waste
Membrane bioreactor
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
School of Chemical Engineering Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 15 Mar 2016, 00:43:38 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)