Attitudes toward learning oral communication skills online: the importance of intrinsic interest and student-instructor differences

Harris, Keith M., Phelan, Liam, McBain, Bonnie, Archer, Jennifer, Drew, Antony J. and James, Carole (2016) Attitudes toward learning oral communication skills online: the importance of intrinsic interest and student-instructor differences. Educational Technology Research and Development, 64 4: 591-609. doi:10.1007/s11423-016-9435-8


Author Harris, Keith M.
Phelan, Liam
McBain, Bonnie
Archer, Jennifer
Drew, Antony J.
James, Carole
Title Attitudes toward learning oral communication skills online: the importance of intrinsic interest and student-instructor differences
Journal name Educational Technology Research and Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1556-6501
1042-1629
Publication date 2016-08
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11423-016-9435-8
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 64
Issue 4
Start page 591
End page 609
Total pages 19
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study examined and compared attitudes of both students and instructors, motivated by an interest in improving the development and delivery of online oral communication learning (OOCL). Few studies have compared student and instructor attitudes toward learning technologies, and no known studies have conducted item response theory (IRT) analyses on these factors. Two independent and anonymous surveys resulted in 255 participants (124 university students, and 131 instructors). Exploratory factor analyses produced final item sets and a two-factor model for student attitudes (Technology Self-efficacy [TSE], and Positive Attitudes [PA]), and a three-factor model for instructors (TSE, Behavioral Intentions, and PA). The OOCL attitude factors showed strong validity through both IRT and classical test theory analyses. Comparisons between students and instructors showed students generally had higher TSE and more positive attitudes towards OOCL. The attitudes most relevant to OOCL were intrinsic interest, behavioral intentions, and perceived usefulness of the technology. This study revealed that technological self-efficacy may be useful for differentiating students and instructors, but not for assessing OOCL attitudes. Further development in this field could focus on the improvement of instructors’ attitudes and skills, as well as exploring the role of intrinsic interest.
Keyword Assessment
Computer assisted
Distance learning
Psychometrics
Technology acceptance model
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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